Amazon #DeliverTheLove, Zomato Independence Day and more: creative ads of the week

Every week, I attempt to share a compilation of clutter-breaking creative ads and occasionally some commentary on the business of advertising. As many have noted, a majority of the ads out there go un-noticed. So managing to break through media clutter is actually a big deal. This week’s compilation includes a touching ad for Amazon India and clever print work for McCafe among others.

Amazon India: Raksha Bandhan

‘What is an insight?’ is a common question in the world of marketing & advertising. Creatives ask this of planners and vice versa. I had written this in an earlier post:

So what is an insight? Among the many definitions I have come across, I found these two to be the most evocative and useful.

An insight is a penetrating observation about consumer behaviour that can be applied to unlock growth.
– Drake Cooper

The second half of this observation – ‘applied to unlock growth’ – is important when it comes to advertising because a good insight is not an end in itself. It has to make a positive impact on the business.

Why is a good insight like a refrigerator? Because the moment you look into it, a light comes on.
– Jeremy Bullmore

This refers to the ‘a-ha!’ moment which flashes in our minds when we see communication based on a good consumer insight. This is strictly not a definition but more of an indicator of what a good insight is.

An ad agency planner friend of mine also defined it very well: a good insight is ‘unthought known’. It is unearthing an aspect of human behaviour which is not so apparent and on the surface. It is not just important to identify a good insight – it has to be crafted well – so that it evokes a personal connect (‘I know how that feels like’ or ‘I know what you are talking about – it happened to me too’).

I thought of these as I believe there is a universal insight in a touching new ad for Raksha Bandhan.

Agency: In-House

I should point out here that in advertising it is common for an insight to be retrofitted into a presentation deck after the creatives have been developed. Anyway, in my view the above ad would have many viewers going ‘yes, I know how this feels like’ and the insight or universal truth could be phrased thus: our siblings and parents often overlook our flaws or shoddy work and praise us so as to not hurt our feelings. The script has a refreshing take on sibling love and looks distinct among the slew of Raksha Bandhan ads this season.

Channel 4: Paralympics poster

When in advertising, I recall getting into arguments with clients (and not winning) who’d insist on seeing work that is direct and straightforward (read boring). Very often the justification would be ‘I get it, but the consumer will not’. The assumption is that consumers do not have the capability to ‘connect the dots’ and have to be fed ‘A for Apple’ kind of communication. Thankfully, some clients think otherwise. Here’s a show-stopper of a headline to convey that Paralympics are being telecast on Channel 4.




Tanishq: celebrating sisters in law

This Rakshabandhan, celebrate your bhabhi too, with the special Lumba Rakhi that doubles up as a pendant‘ is the premise. It’s a commendable effort to be different not just from a messaging POV but with a product offering too.

Agency: Dentsu Webchutney

Tata Tea Chakra Gold Care:

A new variant of Tata Tea Chakra Gold Care has five natural ingredients that have been traditionally used in Tamil households for their health benefits. This is presented as something as a manifestation of showing care – something which comes naturally to the people of Tamil Nadu. Heartening to see efforts being put in to create communication specifically for regional markets.

Agency: Mullen Lintas

Tata Tea Premium: desh ki chai

‘Acts, not ads’ maybe the credo of BBDO but it is put to use in a campaign by Mullen Lintas for Tata Tea Premium. The brand has created region-specific advertising in the recent past. Now instead of limiting it to a claim, they are supporting local artisans who hand paint Kulhads (clay cups) which are then put on sale. While the body copy is a bit difficult to read (Hindi written in English script) I thought the initiative needs support and recognition.

Swiggy Instamart: sugar

In continuation of a campaign which pitches quick delivery of Instamart against competing brands which offer delivery slots the next day, a new ad highlights another every day item. The local touch (‘only little bit queue is there’, ’15 minutes is enough, da’) bring a smile and make it endearing.

McCafe: deck chairs

Several elements of McDonald’s brand are iconic: the arch, brand colours, packaging, the fries and even the cup of coffee. Many campaigns have used them as visual puns which act as brand reminders. Some of them have been done to death. Here are a couple which look refreshingly different.

Agency: Cossette

Zomato: Independence Day

Readers of this blog may think that I am against topical advertising or what has come to be known as ‘moment marketing’. I am not. However, I am not in favour of ‘doing something’ for the sake of doing it out of FOMO or trying to force fit a brand message when there is no link to the occasion and the brand proposition. There are two kinds of topical ads: one which is created on the occasion of festivals or national holidays. And then the other kind which associates or rids piggyback on a news or topical event of the day to put out creatives. About the former, marketers should not assume that consumers eagerly look forward to a brand wishing them on Diwali, Eid, Onam, Christmas or Pongal. We live in a world where even close friends & family make do with such through forwarded WhatsApp messages. In that context, will I feel cheated if a floor tile brand chooses not to put out a occasion-driven greeting message? Unlikely. But there is force-fit galore. A floor tile brand will try and force-fit a link to to say, Independence Day (‘The day we stopped allowing British rulers to walk all over us’). In most cases the effort shows. And then there’s moment marketing – using (in a bad way) or being opportunistic to somehow associate a news event of the day to the brand. Of course there are positives to the brand when such efforts click. It is linked to the creative going viral and being appreciated on college and alumni WhatsApp groups.

In this context, there are efforts which seem natural, have a direct link to the brand, bring a smile and make the brand endearing. Loved it. I am guessing this is an in-house creative.

Which one was your favourite? Do comment in.

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